Schools’ Competitions in full swing

Schools’ Competitions in full swing

This is the first term of the new academic year and we are already off to the start of sport competitions in and between schools around St Vincent and the Grenadines.

The Schools Games Committee, the body charged with responsibility for the planning and management of annual inter schools’ competitions, have met and the stage is set for a flurry

A rationalised national sport structure

A rationalised national sport structure

It is unfortunate that despite claims by successive governments in this country little attention has ever been placed on locating physical literacy, physical activity and sport an appropriate role in the broader matter of genuine national development.

While we have become aware that development is about people we have failed to do much to encourage Vincentians into an understanding of

Some important national sporting developments

Some important national sporting developments

Over the past several years we have been hammering away at the fact that St Vincent and the Grenadines remains well behind the vast majority of its Caribbean neighbours in terms of sporting infrastructure. The argument being made on each occasion is that without proper sport infrastructure it is certainly not possible to help Vincentian athletes even approximate their capacities

Project Field Events

Project Field Events

St Vincent and the Grenadines does not possess a synthetic track. The implications of this fact for athletes desirous of becoming sprinters are numerous.

Coaches must know the long list of challenges they face in seeking to produce world class sprinters utilising only grassed surfaces. It is therefore rather interesting to find so many of them attempting to convince athletes that it is possible to compete favourably in the international arena having used only grassed surfaces in their preparation.

That National Sports City

That National Sports City

In the previous edition of this Column, dated Friday 1 September 2017, we addressed the matter of the options available to us if we are serious about getting a synthetic surface in place and eventually provide Vincentians with a grand national stadium.

Many have been discussing the issues raised in last week’s Column if only because of the interest that they have in seeing this country provide appropriate facilities to give the youths a more even playing field in the sporting arena at the regional and international levels.

SVG’s stadium options

SVG’s stadium options

St Vincent and the Grenadines remains one of the few countries in the Caribbean that does not yet possess a national stadium. Indeed, in the region, it is now commonplace that a country should be have a national stadium in so far as athletics and football are concerned.

Of course, for many years we have been touting the Arnos Vale Sports Complex as the nation’s cricket stadium.

Development must be a collective endeavour

The curtains came down on the International Association of Athletics Federations’ (IAAF) World Championships in London, England, on Sunday last, with the usual massive crowd in attendance bidding official farewell to both Usain Bolt and Mo Farah.

In the previous Column we addressed the fact that they left active competition in different styles but their impact would remain with the sport for a very long time to come.

Whither the Arnos Vale Sports Complex?

Carnival 2015 is finished. The pundits will once more determine in their own way the outcome. One thing is certain, it was not like the days of old and there was no spirit to speak about.

This week we return to the thorny issue of our sports facilities, the Arnos Vale Sports Complex in particular, and the failure of the authorities to ensure that they are appropriately maintained.

Is sport a political football?

The recent global scandal involving the top guns at the level of FIFA and some of the regional and national football bodies should come ads no surprise to the followers of the sport.

Many analysts have always made the claim in more than jest that sport involves as much intrigue and politics as national politics in countries around the world.

IT’S OK TO DREAM

IT’S OK TO DREAM

“Young me dream dreams”

That’s the old saying that means so very much. It is a saying that captures the ebullience of youth around the world at a stage in their lives when caution is so often thrown to the wind and everything seems possible.

Young people, regardless of ethnicity, race, beliefs, geographical location, class and status, all dream. The ebullience of youth allows them, as of right, to dream of endless possibilities in their lives. Nothing seems insurmountable, in their eyes.